How to lose your 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status (without really trying)

Reporting Fraudulent Tax Exempt “Charity” Organizations

Federal Government Internal Revenue Service

Members of the public may send information that raises questions about an exempt organization’s compliance with the Internal Revenue Code to IRS – EO Referrals, 1100 Commerce Street, MC 4910 DAL, Dallas, TX  75242.  They may use Form 13909 PDFTax-Exempt Organization Complaint (Referral) Form, for this purpose.

In addition to oversight by the IRS, tax-exempt organizations are subject to oversight by State charity regulators and State tax agencies.  You may also want to send a copy of the referral you send to us to your state charity regulatorand/or state tax agency.

IRS.gov

State of Ohio

If you suspect a violation of charitable laws is occurring, you can file a complaint by completing and submitting the online complaint form, by calling the Ohio Attorney General Help Center at 800-282-0515 or by completing the paper complaint form and submitting it via mail or email.

File a Complaint

Ohio Attorney General

State of California

The Attorney General investigates charitable organizations and fundraisers and brings administrative and legal enforcement actions against them. See the Charities home page and links on the right for more details about specific programs, laws, forms and the Registry Verification Search tool.

The Attorney General encourages the public to file complaints regarding a charity or charitable solicitation using the Complaint Form (Form CT-9) available below.

Form CT-9

Charity Complaint Form

This form is required to file all complaints regarding charities or fundraising professionals with the Attorney General’s Registry of Charitable Trusts.

In addition to filing a complaint with the Attorney General’s Registry of Charitable Trusts, consider also filing complaints with:

Better Business Bureau: (916) 443-6843

Department of Consumer Affairs: (916) 445-1254

Internal Revenue Service

Local Police Department

California Attorney General

From the IRS:

It’s easy for a 501(c)(3) organization to maintain its tax exempt status – and can be just as easy to lose it.

A 501(c)(3) organization can maintain its tax-exempt status if it follows the rules affecting these six areas: private benefit/inurement, lobbying, political campaign activity, unrelated business income (UBI), annual reporting obligation, and operation in accordance with stated exempt purpose(s).

1. Private benefit / Inurement

Private benefit:

A 501(c)(3) organization’s activities should be directed toward some exempt purpose. Its activities should not serve the private interests, or private benefit, of any individual or organization more than insubstantially.

Inurement:

A 501(c)(3) organization is prohibited from allowing its income or assets to benefit insiders – typically board members, officers, directors and important employees of an organization. If an organization benefits insiders, the insiders and the organization could be subject to penalty excise taxes and the organization could lose its tax-exempt status.

Think Computer Foundation soliciting donations from TSLAQ with Tesla short selling work
Think Computer Foundation working with TSLAQ stock traders to inure private benefit to the short selling bets of Aaron Greenspan and others
Think Computer Foundation activity intended to inure private benefit to Tesla short sellers, who signed onto the letter
Think Computer Foundation donations used to inure private benefit to Tesla short sellers
Think Computer Foundation soliciting donations to inure private benefit to TSLAQ short sellers including founder Aaron Greenspan
Think Computer Foundation soliciting donations with promise to inure private benefit to Tesla short selling bets of Aaron Greenspan and others
Think Computer Foundation soliciting donations with promise to inure private benefit to Tesla short selling bets of Aaron Greenspan and others
Think Computer Foundation promises tax deduction for activities that inure private benefit to Tesla short sellers including founder Aaron Greenspan
Think Computer Foundation soliciting donations to inure private benefit to Tesla short selling bets of Aaron Greenspan and others
Think Computer Foundation issues FOIA request to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Tesla short selling bets
Think Computer Foundation uses charitable funds to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Tesla short selling bets
Think Computer Foundation issues legal challenge to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Tesla short selling bets
Think Computer Foundation focused on inuring private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Tesla short selling bets
Think Computer Foundation solicits donations in order to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan and other donors’ Tesla short selling bets
Think Computer Foundation solicits donations by harassing Tesla customers,
Think Computer Foundation admits to violating fiduciary duty with obsessive focus on Tesla
Think Computer Foundation funds used to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan and Tesla short sellers
Think Compter Foundation focused on inuring private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Tesla short selling bets
Think Computer Foundation soliciting donations by promising to inure private benefit to Tesla short sellers
Think Computer Foundation admits board members are shorting companies that the foundation is focused on researching
Think Computer Foundation solicits donations to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Tesla short-selling bets
Think Computer Foundation requests documents to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Tesla short selling bets
Think Computer Foundation working to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Tesla short selling bets
Think Computer Foundation seeks media coverage in order to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Tesla short selling bets
Think Computer Foundation seeks to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Tesla short-selling bets
Think Computer Foundation solicits donations by promising to inure private benefit to Tesla short selling bets of Aaron Greenspan and donors
Think Computer Foundation attorney seeking to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Tesla short selling bets
Think Computer Foundation solicits donations from Tesla short sellers
Think Computer Foundation working to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Tesla short selling bets
Think Computer Foundation solicits donations promising to inure private benefit to Tesla short selling bets of Aaron Greenspan and donors
Think Computer Foundation finances public records request to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Tesla short selling position
Think Computer Foundation uses lawsuit against Elon Musk to solicit donations, inure private benefit to Tesla short selling bets
Think Computer Foundation activity designed to inure private benefit to Aaron Greenspan’s Facebook short selling bets, personal ego, and desire for revenge

2. Lobbying

Lobbying is when an organization contacts, or urges the public to contact, members or employees of a legislative body (or any executive branch official who may participate in the formulation of legislation) for the purpose of proposing, supporting, or opposing legislation, or when the organization advocates the adoption or rejection of legislation.

While a 501(c)(3) organization is allowed to do some lobbying, too much can hurt its tax-exempt status. Its lobbying activities cannot be more than an insubstantial part of its overall activities.

“Just because we’re not paid to lobby doesn’t mean we aren’t able”

3. Political Activity

Under the Internal Revenue Code, all section 501(c)(3) organizations are absolutely prohibited from directly or indirectly participating in, or intervening in, any political campaign on behalf of (or in opposition to) any candidate for elective public office. Contributions to political campaign funds or public statements of position (verbal or written) made on behalf of the organization in favor of or in opposition to any candidate for public office clearly violate the prohibition against political campaign activity.  Violating this prohibition may result in denial or revocation of tax-exempt status and the imposition of certain excise taxes.

4. Unrelated Business Income

Earning too much income generated from unrelated activities can jeopardize an organization’s 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status. This income comes from a regularly carried- on trade or business that is not substantially related to the organization’s exempt purpose. However, there are some modifications, exclusions and exceptions.

Tesla short sellers paying Aaron Greenspan to threaten Tesla customers. Donating to inure private benefit to their short selling bets, not further the charity’s exempt purpose

5. Annual reporting obligation

Think Computer Foundation tax exempt status previously revoked for failing to satisfy annual reporting obligation
Charity operated and solicited donations illegally in California from 2006 – 2020. Initial registration came only after allegations of tax fraud

6. Operation in accord with stated exempt purpose(s)

An organization must pursue the exempt activities it promised in its IRS application for exemption. If an organization has deviated from its original purposes, it must inform the IRS to prevent future problems.

Original exempt purpose declared by the Think Computer Foundation

Original exempt activities promised in IRS application:

  1. Donation of used computers
  2. Operating an internet accessible database of donations
  3. Traveling to Jamaica to teach kids about computer
Think Computer Foundation promises to assist children. Instead now it threatens and harasses children.
Updated bylaws filed with State of California

Aaron Greenspan has filed an illegal SLAPP-suit against Elon Musk and Omar Qazi for bringing attention to allegations of tax fraud, securities fraud, cyberstalking, and criminal harassment by the Think Computer Foundation (doing business as PlainSite). If you can please donate to the Legal GoFundMe or via PayPal to make sure Aaron Jacob Greenspan is finally held accountable for his criminal misconduct.

2 thoughts on “How to lose your 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status (without really trying)

  1. An interview with Ying Lei and Eric Teasley would make Aaron Greenspan would make him PMS. We can hear the entire story of why he was kicked out of stanford.

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